REAL Democracy History Calendar: November 26 – December 2

November 26

2003 — Statement of Lewis Pitts, former Program on Corporations, Law & Democracy (POCLAD) principal
“I think what I believe is totally balanced and therefore moderate. I think the essential political unit is the individual, and not corporations. So in that sense I guess I’m a populist.”
http://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/lifetime-fighter/Content?oid=1190831

November 27

2012 – Published article, “Reconsider Buckley v. Valeo” by Sam Fedele, OpEd News
“ Buckley’s ‘money is speech’ doctrine also puts space between members of the privileged class itself by creating a form of speech which scales with wealth. The more money one has the more speech one has. This rings Orwellian. Some speakers are more equal than others. And with the media focus of modern elections, political speech that effectively reaches the masses is reserved for the modern aristocracy alone.”
http://www.opednews.com/articles/Reconsider-Buckley-v-Vale-by-Sam-Fedele-121126-574.html

November 28

2011 — Published article, “’We the People’ versus ‘We the Corporation’: Sentiment Builds for Banning Corporate Personhood, But Tough Road Ahead” by Steven Rosenfeld, AlterNet
“Across the country, momentum has been building for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution declaring that the democratic rights and freedoms granted to people do not apply to corporations and corporate entities…

“There has been an ebb and flow of those rights and powers for more than a century. But in the past 30 years, culminating in Citizens United, the balance of power between individuals and corporations has swung away from average citizens to the richest and most powerful institutions. That is because they have found new ways to spend money in campaigns and have been awarded new speech rights in federal court.”
http://www.alternet.org/story/153185/%27we_the_people%27_versus_%27we_the_corporation%27%3A_sentiment_builds_for_banning_corporate_personhood%2C_but_tough_road_ahead

November 29

1816 — Birth of Morrison Waite, Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court
Waite presided over the Supreme Court during the ruling of Santa Clara v. Southern Pacific Railroad (118 U.S. 394, 1886), which first established that corporations possessed Constitutional Amendment “rights” – sort of.

The Justices themselves did not specifically make their decision in favor of the railroad on constitutional grounds. Instead, J.C. Bancroft Davis, court reporter and former banker, transcribed this oral remark in the decision’s “headnotes” (which summarized the case): “The court does not wish to hear argument on the question whether the provision in the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, which forbids any state to deny any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws, applies to these corporations. We are of the opinion that it does.”

The remark appeared in the headnotes, but nowhere else. Morrison agreed with the wording and its placement. It set a precedent, which was cited in succeeding Supreme Court cases granting corporations 14th Amendment and other constitutional rights.

1898 – Birth of C.S. Lewis, British novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, broadcaster, lecture
“The greatest evil is not now done in those sordid ‘dens of crime’ that Dickens loved to paint. It is not done even in concentration camps and labour camps. In those we see its final result. But it is conceived and ordered (moved, seconded, carried, and minuted) in clean, carpeted, warmed and well-lighted offices, by quiet men with white collars and cut fingernails and smooth-shaven cheeks who do not need to raise their voices. Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern.” ― C.S. Lewis, The Screwtape Letters

November 30

1930 — Death of Mother Jones, worker’s rights activist
“Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.”
“I asked a man in prison once how he happened to be there and he said he had stolen a pair of shoes. I told him if he had stolen a railroad he would be a United States Senator.”
“Injustice boils in men’s hearts as does steel in its cauldron, ready to pour forth, white hot, in the fullness of time.”

1990 — Death of Norman Cousins
“In a democracy, the individual enjoys not only the ultimate power but carries the ultimate responsibility”

1999 — First day of WTO meetings and “Battle of Seattle” against global corporatization
More than 40,000 individuals from across the world, the largest demonstration up to that time, gathered to protest international trade agreements. They opposed the anti-democratic, anti-worker, anti-consumer and anti-environmental efforts to establish a global “trade” organization that would “harmonize” (i.e. reduce to lowest common denominator) national laws and regulations in ways that would be corporate-friendly.

Protestors effectively shut down the negotiations before a final agreement was reached. The protests emboldened representatives from less developed countries that argued that they and their people and natural resources would be exploited by the proposed terms.

December 1

1885 – Dodge v. Woolsey (59 U.S. 331) Supreme Court decision – corporations are “creatures of the state”
The United States Supreme Court has reaffirmed the principle that corporations are “creatures of the state” in at least thirty-six different rulings. This is one of them.

1955 – Rosa Parks refuses to surrender her seat to a white passenger, is arrested, leading to Montgomery Bus Boycott
Parks was a civil rights activist with the NAACP. She attended a civil rights leadership-training workshop at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee earlier in the year. Her defiance resulted in her arrest, sparking the Montgomery Bus Boycott. With downtown businesses suffering financial losses and the Supreme Court upholding a lower court decision declaring racial segregation laws unconstitutional, the boycott ended after 381 days. The boycott was an important marker in the Civil Rights movement of the 1950’s and 1960’s.

December 2

2015 – First of 3 programs focusing on African American cooperative economics
The series took place in Austin, TX and was sponsored by Cooperation Texas.
The first program, African-American film shorts, provided “an inside look at thriving worker-owned cooperatives in Black communities with two mini documentaries featuring Cooperative Home Care Associates and Mandela Foods.”

Inequality “has disproportionately affected Black communities. What can be done to address systemic inequality? For generations, African Americans have experimented with cooperative economics in order to survive and thrive.” Cooperatives are means for individuals to take greater control of their communities.
http://cooperationtexas.coop/2015/10/african-american-cooperative-economics-series-2/

2011 – Published article, “Curbing Corporate Power: The Next Step for the Movement to Slow Climate Change” by Carol Polsgrove, The Bloomington Alternative
“Following up on the White House demonstrations to stop the Keystone XL pipeline, Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, is already hard at work on the next stage of the movement to rein in reliance on fossil fuels.

“On a three-state speaking tour, he is calling for a constitutional amendment to undo the damage the Supreme Court did when it declared corporations as persons and campaign contributions as speech. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce spent more money last election cycle than the Democratic and Republican national committees combined – and 97 percent of that went to climate deniers, he told an audience in Asheville on Nov. 30. The climate change movement has to figure out how to break ‘the corporate power dominating our political lives.’”
http://www.bloomingtonalternative.com/node/10871

 

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